The War On Charity

My latest column is up at AND Magazine!

Here is an excerpt:

 

There is nothing in our world today that is not regulated, legislated, or otherwise controlled by the government in some way. It is no wonder we are constantly told that American capitalism has failed; the Invisible Hand has so much control over so many areas of our lives that it’s almost a wonder private citizens are able to function at all.

 

But there are consequences of government interventionism that go far beyond private sector capitalism and the ability of private citizens to conduct business. More and more, the puppet-masters in governments from towns to cities to states, and all the way up to the federal government increasingly have a negative impact on the efforts of private charities to have a positive impact on cities and communities across America.

 

When you get right down to it, there are two ways the government tends to interfere in private charities: directly and indirectly.

 

It’s hard enough for charities to keep sufficient income coming in during tough economic times; organizations that depend on charitable giving in order to stay afloat can find keeping the doors open to be extra challenging when people have less money to give. But when you add in a high level of economic uncertainty, it becomes even more difficult for charitable organizations to solicit donations or convince even some of the most charitable people to make financial commitments to those organizations dedicated to serving those in need.

 

Throw in higher taxes, more regulations – just the kinds of things that make businesses afraid to expand, that make the wealthy afraid to invest – these are the same kinds of factors that make it easier for people to hold on to their money. High gas prices, a shrinking economy, a constant push by the government to displace charitable organizations through welfare and food stamps.

Continue reading here.

 

 

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